Quaker

Bienvenue

A birth sampler to welcome a new family member
 
Price: 9 euros
Area in stitches: 267 x 153
 
Bienvenue is inspired by the Ackworth School Quaker style of motifs which incorporate stylised swans, flowers and birds in half medallion shapes and cartouches.
 
Many of the motifs carry an innate symbolism - the dog for loyalty, a bird on a branch for love of nature, the swan for purety, the butterfly for exuberance, a rose for the mother and the buds for her children, carnations for motherly love.
 
Bienvenue is unique in that it allows for the inclusion of, not only the names and date of birth of the infant, but also for the initials of the parents and grandparents thus creating a very personal family momento.
 
In addition to the design, Bienvenue reproduces two extra pages of grid with blanked out sections for you to add the infants name and date of birth and family initials prior to stitching.  There are also some extra motifs included which can be used to fill in space if the chosen name is short and does not fill up all of the alloted space.
 

Foursome Reel

 
Price: 15 euros
Area in stitches: 108 x 276, 104 x 132, 132 x 132, 246 x 134
 
Foursome Reel named after a Scottish dance comprises four designs which can be treated separately or arranged as a group.  It was designed to celebrate the 10th anniversary of Long Dog Samplers which first started up in 1996.
 

Mouline Rouge

 
Price: 19 euros
Area in stitches: 364 x 364
 
Named after the tiny hamlet where I live this sampler is based on components from two schools of cross stitch design - the Bristol orphanages and the Friendship sampler patterns.  During the mid 19th century Bristol orphanages were noted for their use of red cotton.  No corner of the cloth was left unfilled.  The children who made the samplers would almost certainly enter domestic service and be expected to produce, amongst other duties, items of linenware featuring alphabet letters and numerals.
 
The patterns of Friendship samplers were similar to those applied to knitted pincushions produced towards the end of the 18th century.  Normally featuring circular or hexagonal designs they probably found their own origins in pocket watch papers
 

Quaker's Dozen


 Price: 9 euros
Area in stitches: 226 x 300
 
The Quaker's Dozen was a set of rules by which Quaker's used to try and live their lives:
 
1.  Begin each day with a moment of prayer
2.  Work hard
3.  Love family
4.  Make light of trouble
5.  Follow the Golden Rule (- no idea I'm afraid)
6.  Study the good book
7.  Show kindness
8.  Read worthwhile literature
9.  Be clean and pure
10.  Have charity in your heart
11.  Be respectful of others
12.  End each day with a moment of prayer
 
You could do a whole lot worse than that I suppose.
 

Scarlet Ribands

 
Price: 19 euros
Area in stitches: 314 x 321
 
Scarlet Ribands is a sampler in the Quaker style.  These samplers would often include some uplifting words or thoughts and Scarlet Ribands is no exception - for example, "Make much of time" and "Practice makes perfect" amongst others.
 

The Token

 
Price: 9 euros
Area in stitches: 200 x 235
 
The Token is designed in the styke of the well-known medallion or "friendship" samplers stitched by pupils of Ackworth School, York, England in the late 18th century.  These samplers were usually worked on one colour for economy.  Ackworth was a Quaker school and the hallmark medallions peculiar to Quaker needlework can be found not only in England but also in North American schools at West Town, Pennsylvania and Nine Partners in New York who produced similar work.
 
Strong friendships were often forged under the spartan regime of Ackworth School and girls would dedicate their work either to another pupil or favourite teacher.
 
The Token has been adapted as a wedding gift from a new bride to her husband and could easily be modified to mark a special anniversary, friendship or event by the use of the alphabet provided with the design.

2 comments:

  1. The Golden Rule is 'Love your neighbour as yourself' - in other words, treat other people as you would like them to treat you. Beautiful designs!

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  2. I was taught the Golden Rule is "Do unto others, as your would have others do unto you." Same message, but a bit more formal.

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